Daniël van der Winden
Daniël van der Winden

Newsletters

Keeping up with newsletters is not something I'm particularly good at, but I always find these worth a read.

The New Yorker

Penguin Books

Scott Tobias & Keith Phipps

New York Magazine

Patrick Tanguay

Anne Helen Petersen

The Common Reader

Henry Oliver

Henry Oliver

Newsletters

Keeping up with newsletters is not something I'm particularly good at, but I always find these worth a read.

The New Yorker

Penguin Books

Scott Tobias & Keith Phipps

New York Magazine

Patrick Tanguay

Anne Helen Petersen

The Common Reader

Henry Oliver

Henry Oliver

Elsewhere

You can find me on various other platforms.

dvdwinden

daniel

dvdwinden

danielvdw

danielpizza

dvdwinden

Elsewhere

You can find me on various other platforms.

dvdwinden

daniel

dvdwinden

danielvdw

danielpizza

dvdwinden

Tools & Services

Digital products I use daily or weekly.

A very powerful budgeting tool

A nimbler, more visual LinkedIn

The world's nicest online film community

A small, indie, Bezos-less book club

The modern presentation tool

Beautiful app for focused writing

Tools & Services

Digital products I use daily or weekly.

A very powerful budgeting tool

A nimbler, more visual LinkedIn

The world's nicest online film community

A small, indie, Bezos-less book club

The modern presentation tool

Beautiful app for focused writing

Instrument • Published March 29, 2022

The Eames Institute enlisted Instrument to “co-create a digital platform to unveil their vast collection to the world”. A dream client if there ever was one, the folks at Instrument asked themselves: can a website have a soul? The answer is a resounding yes, and the accompanying case study documents that work beautifully.

The Eames Institute enlisted Instrument to “co-create a digital platform to unveil their vast collection to the world”. A dream client if there ever was one, the folks at Instrument asked themselves: can a website have a soul? The answer is a resounding yes, and the accompanying case study documents that work beautifully.

A film by Perfume Genius & Jacolby Satterwhite • Published June 16, 2022

I've been a fan of Perfume Genius ever since he released No Shape in 2017. His latest album, Ugly Season, is out now and accompanied by the film above. I highly recommend you listen to the album in full—start to finish, no interruptions, preferably with headphones on—because it is an experience. To me, this is his finest album yet; an album that combines and builds upon all the beautiful things he's created over the years and, at the same time, takes it to another level. The visual by Jacolby Satterwhite is mind-boggling, a mesmerising tasting platter of Ugly Season.

I've been a fan of Perfume Genius ever since he released No Shape in 2017. His latest album, Ugly Season, is out now and accompanied by the film above. I highly recommend you listen to the album in full—start to finish, no interruptions, preferably with headphones on—because it is an experience. To me, this is his finest album yet; an album that combines and builds upon all the beautiful things he's created over the years and, at the same time, takes it to another level. The visual by Jacolby Satterwhite is mind-boggling, a mesmerising tasting platter of Ugly Season.

I've been a fan of Perfume Genius ever since he released No Shape in 2017. His latest album, Ugly Season, is out now and accompanied by the film above. I highly recommend you listen to the album in full—start to finish, no interruptions, preferably with headphones on—because it is an experience. To me, this is his finest album yet; an album that combines and builds upon all the beautiful things he's created over the years and, at the same time, takes it to another level. The visual by Jacolby Satterwhite is mind-boggling, a mesmerising tasting platter of Ugly Season.

I've been a fan of Perfume Genius ever since he released No Shape in 2017. His latest album, Ugly Season, is out now and accompanied by the film above. I highly recommend you listen to the album in full—start to finish, no interruptions, preferably with headphones on—because it is an experience. To me, this is his finest album yet; an album that combines and builds upon all the beautiful things he's created over the years and, at the same time, takes it to another level. The visual by Jacolby Satterwhite is mind-boggling, a mesmerising tasting platter of Ugly Season.

Lately I've been digging into methods for asynchronous work and learning about how to implement them, because I think we (still) have a little way to go in that respect. I've found Twist's newsletter on the matter very insightful. It's not too preachy and highlights pros and cons of asynchronous (and synchronous) work in an accessible way. If you're into designing how a company (your company?) communicates, this is a good place to start.

Lately I've been digging into methods for asynchronous work and learning about how to implement them, because I think we (still) have a little way to go in that respect. I've found Twist's newsletter on the matter very insightful. It's not too preachy and highlights pros and cons of asynchronous (and synchronous) work in an accessible way. If you're into designing how a company (your company?) communicates, this is a good place to start.

Lately I've been digging into methods for asynchronous work and learning about how to implement them, because I think we (still) have a little way to go in that respect. I've found Twist's newsletter on the matter very insightful. It's not too preachy and highlights pros and cons of asynchronous (and synchronous) work in an accessible way. If you're into designing how a company (your company?) communicates, this is a good place to start.

A Dutch man named Martijn purchased two historic cabins on top of a hill in Italy with the goal to renovate them and create a homestead. He's a photographer, so the process of him doing so is incredibly well documented. I've seen folks get put off a bit by the idea of him “being alone in nature, yet followed persistently by a drone”, but I've really enjoyed watching these videos. They're very soothing, and you can watch them actively or have them on in the background. It's fascinating to see him go about everything from shielding himself from the cold, to setting up solar panels, or driving wood up the hill to build a temporary cabin. Lovely stuff. Thanks for sharing, Marius!

A Dutch man named Martijn purchased two historic cabins on top of a hill in Italy with the goal to renovate them and create a homestead. He's a photographer, so the process of him doing so is incredibly well documented. I've seen folks get put off a bit by the idea of him “being alone in nature, yet followed persistently by a drone”, but I've really enjoyed watching these videos. They're very soothing, and you can watch them actively or have them on in the background. It's fascinating to see him go about everything from shielding himself from the cold, to setting up solar panels, or driving wood up the hill to build a temporary cabin. Lovely stuff. Thanks for sharing, Marius!

A Dutch man named Martijn purchased two historic cabins on top of a hill in Italy with the goal to renovate them and create a homestead. He's a photographer, so the process of him doing so is incredibly well documented. I've seen folks get put off a bit by the idea of him “being alone in nature, yet followed persistently by a drone”, but I've really enjoyed watching these videos. They're very soothing, and you can watch them actively or have them on in the background. It's fascinating to see him go about everything from shielding himself from the cold, to setting up solar panels, or driving wood up the hill to build a temporary cabin. Lovely stuff. Thanks for sharing, Marius!

A Dutch man named Martijn purchased two historic cabins on top of a hill in Italy with the goal to renovate them and create a homestead. He's a photographer, so the process of him doing so is incredibly well documented. I've seen folks get put off a bit by the idea of him “being alone in nature, yet followed persistently by a drone”, but I've really enjoyed watching these videos. They're very soothing, and you can watch them actively or have them on in the background. It's fascinating to see him go about everything from shielding himself from the cold, to setting up solar panels, or driving wood up the hill to build a temporary cabin. Lovely stuff. Thanks for sharing, Marius!

My colleague Amy recommended this podcast with Molly Mielke in which she speaks about her thesis on computers and creativity, which I'm linking to here. It's a delightful read, one that makes me excited about the future of computers & computing. To quote Molly:

“Computers have, since their inception, been a rigid tool that the human user has had to adapt to use... However, through standardization, moldability, and abstraction, we can dramatically expand the utility of computers while broadening their capacity to help more people solve their problems creatively.”

My colleague Amy recommended this podcast with Molly Mielke in which she speaks about her thesis on computers and creativity, which I'm linking to here. It's a delightful read, one that makes me excited about the future of computers & computing. To quote Molly:

“Computers have, since their inception, been a rigid tool that the human user has had to adapt to use... However, through standardization, moldability, and abstraction, we can dramatically expand the utility of computers while broadening their capacity to help more people solve their problems creatively.”

My colleague Amy recommended this podcast with Molly Mielke in which she speaks about her thesis on computers and creativity, which I'm linking to here. It's a delightful read, one that makes me excited about the future of computers & computing. To quote Molly:

“Computers have, since their inception, been a rigid tool that the human user has had to adapt to use... However, through standardization, moldability, and abstraction, we can dramatically expand the utility of computers while broadening their capacity to help more people solve their problems creatively.”

Brought to my attention by Fabian, in response to my essay on the intimacy of experiencing a film in a movie theatre, Soderbergh's address—dating back to 2013—is an impassioned speech, arguing that film culture is “under assault by the studios”.

Brought to my attention by Fabian, in response to my essay on the intimacy of experiencing a film in a movie theatre, Soderbergh's address—dating back to 2013—is an impassioned speech, arguing that film culture is “under assault by the studios”.

Brought to my attention by Fabian, in response to my essay on the intimacy of experiencing a film in a movie theatre, Soderbergh's address—dating back to 2013—is an impassioned speech, arguing that film culture is “under assault by the studios”.

Brought to my attention by Fabian, in response to my essay on the intimacy of experiencing a film in a movie theatre, Soderbergh's address—dating back to 2013—is an impassioned speech, arguing that film culture is “under assault by the studios”.

Ocean Vuong's On Earth We're Briefly Gorgeous is, already, one of my favourite books I've read in 2022. It's an incredible and sensitively written book. He has now won a MacArthur “genius” grant, and spoke to The New Yorker about his approach to writing.

Ocean Vuong's On Earth We're Briefly Gorgeous is, already, one of my favourite books I've read in 2022. It's an incredible and sensitively written book. He has now won a MacArthur “genius” grant, and spoke to The New Yorker about his approach to writing.

Jerrod Carmichael & Tyler Okonma

As I watched Jerrod Carmichael's latest special “Rothaniel” – which is really, really special – I was reminded of this conversation he had with Tyler, The Creator back in 2018. An interview unlike any other, and I've thought about it often since I first saw it.

As I watched Jerrod Carmichael's latest special “Rothaniel” – which is really, really special – I was reminded of this conversation he had with Tyler, The Creator back in 2018. An interview unlike any other, and I've thought about it often since I first saw it.

As I watched Jerrod Carmichael's latest special “Rothaniel” – which is really, really special – I was reminded of this conversation he had with Tyler, The Creator back in 2018. An interview unlike any other, and I've thought about it often since I first saw it.

After reading Dan Charnas' book on J Dilla, I am even more convinced he belongs among the legends. This op-ed in the LA Times briefly explains why. If you're a fan of J Dilla—or The Roots, or Thundercat, or Kamasi Washington, or Erykah Badu, or...—I highly recommend you read Dilla Time.

After reading Dan Charnas' book on J Dilla, I am even more convinced he belongs among the legends. This op-ed in the LA Times briefly explains why. If you're a fan of J Dilla—or The Roots, or Thundercat, or Kamasi Washington, or Erykah Badu, or...—I highly recommend you read Dilla Time.

This 5-chapter podcast by journalist Alex Pappademas is the best podcast on music I've found in quite some time. Instead of dissecting the music beat by beat, he dives deeper into the creative process and the context in which the music was made, speaking to the collaborators that helped Kendrick make the album, as well as to the man himself. “Good Kid was the classic, DAMN. was the blockbuster, and To Pimp A Butterfly the masterpiece.”

This 5-chapter podcast by journalist Alex Pappademas is the best podcast on music I've found in quite some time. Instead of dissecting the music beat by beat, he dives deeper into the creative process and the context in which the music was made, speaking to the collaborators that helped Kendrick make the album, as well as to the man himself. “Good Kid was the classic, DAMN. was the blockbuster, and To Pimp A Butterfly the masterpiece.”

This 5-chapter podcast by journalist Alex Pappademas is the best podcast on music I've found in quite some time. Instead of dissecting the music beat by beat, he dives deeper into the creative process and the context in which the music was made, speaking to the collaborators that helped Kendrick make the album, as well as to the man himself. “Good Kid was the classic, DAMN. was the blockbuster, and To Pimp A Butterfly the masterpiece.”

This 5-chapter podcast by journalist Alex Pappademas is the best podcast on music I've found in quite some time. Instead of dissecting the music beat by beat, he dives deeper into the creative process and the context in which the music was made, speaking to the collaborators that helped Kendrick make the album, as well as to the man himself. “Good Kid was the classic, DAMN. was the blockbuster, and To Pimp A Butterfly the masterpiece.”

Kodak • Published July 15, 2021

Thai filmmaker Apichatpong Weerasethakul reflects on his latest movie—his first not shot in Thailand— the process of shooting it on film, and the role sound design played in its creation. I absolutely loved watching this in the cinema and highly recommend you do so, if you can.

Mike McQuade • Published January 21, 2022

Over on Criterion's “Current”—a blog that quickly morphed into a full-blown magazine on film—Mike McQuade dives into his design process for the Criterion Collection edition of Citizen Kane. Iconic, yet divisive.

Mandy Brown • Published March 3, 2022

“I want to consider that we borrow some lessons from Le Guin and Shevek and look at ambiguity not merely as something to manage or navigate through, but as something to hold. Something to make space for.”

This essay by Mandy Brown about embracing ambiguity has lingered in my mind ever since I read it. In her newsletter, she wrote that the essay is more “tentative” than she's comfortable with, but I think its tentativeness strengthens the piece. As Mandy writes, and I am inclined to agree: “I’m coming around to thinking that ambiguity, like change, is a constant companion. And maybe instead of manipulating or avoiding it, we need to listen to what it has to say.”

“I want to consider that we borrow some lessons from Le Guin and Shevek and look at ambiguity not merely as something to manage or navigate through, but as something to hold. Something to make space for.” This essay by Mandy Brown about embracing ambiguity has lingered in my mind ever since I read it. In her newsletter, she wrote that the essay is more “tentative” than she's comfortable with, but I think its tentativeness strengthens the piece. As Mandy writes, and I am inclined to agree: “I’m coming around to thinking that ambiguity, like change, is a constant companion. And maybe instead of manipulating or avoiding it, we need to listen to what it has to say.”

Johnny Rodgers • Published February 3, 2022

A long summary of Johnny Rodgers' experience building a modern home in the woods. “It covers the 5 years from before we bought the land to after we completed the house and took residency.” Not quite as long a read as the one by Emmanuel (linked below), but a nice way to dream—inspiring read.

A long summary of Johnny Rodgers' experience building a modern home in the woods. “It covers the 5 years from before we bought the land to after we completed the house and took residency.” Not quite as long a read as the one by Emmanuel (linked below), but a nice way to dream—inspiring read.

Emmanuel Quartey • Published January 22, 2022

A long read distilling two years of learning by Emmanuel Quartey, who designed a home for his family in Accra, Ghana. Fascinating peek at the design process—one can only hope to be able to dabble with a project like this at some point in life.

A long read distilling two years of learning by Emmanuel Quartey, who designed a home for his family in Accra, Ghana. Fascinating peek at the design process—one can only hope to be able to dabble with a project like this at some point in life.

Letterboxd Crew • Published December 31, 2021

Letterboxd reflects on their first decade on the platform by interviewing some early members. Having joined the platform in 2013, it's nice to read how other people have used it and what it's brought them.

The Atlantic • Published June 9, 2021

Jerry Useem with some interesting nuggets with regards to what we're missing out on when we don't commute.

The New Yorker • Published December 19, 2021

A fantastic profile of Jonny Greenwood, best known for his work with Radiohead, elaborating on his work as a composer of incredible film scores.

Kyle Chayka • Published September 18, 2021

Fascinating essay on how digital platforms (like iTunes, Spotify and the like) have killed “collecting” as a hobby.

The New Yorker • Published December 24, 2021

“You didn’t have to agree with her, but you had to submit to her sentences.” In remembrance of Joan Didion, who passed away late in 2021.

Anne Helen Petersen • Published August 5, 2021

A confronting but sobering read by Anne on why we're all still exhausted from this pandemic.

Dan Eden • Published May 26, 2021

“It is entirely reasonable to set a schedule so that in 24 hours, 8 hours are spent sleeping, 8 hours are spent working, and 8 hours are spent living. Any work that can’t be achieved in 8 hours can—must—wait until the next day.”

Here, I collect and regularly update highlights of things I find online. Links to articles and tidbits I think are worth revisiting before they get lost in the ether, serving as a blog without the necessity of writing blog posts.

Last updated: June 28th, 2022

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